Recognition by Bon Appetit magazine

bonappetit-march08.jpgWE ARE SO EXCITED !!!

We just discovered that our book, The Story of Tea A Cultural History and Drinking Guide has been reviewed in the March 2008 issue of Bon Appetit magazine.

You cannot imagine how much it means to us to be so recognized by such an important and beloved voice in the food world. We are overwhelmed, honored and giddy with pleasure. The jacket of our book is shown straight on in all it’s glorious red and black color – an auspicious beginning indeed to the Chinese New Year !

Here is what reviewer Elisa Huang had to say about our book: ” Mary Lou and Robert Heiss, who own the Massachusetts-based specialty store, Cooks Shop Here, cover everything you want to know about one of the world’s finest drinks.”

Then, we discovered that Editor-in-Chief Barbara Fairchild mentioned our book in her monthly Letter from the Editor on page 22. She said: ” Get that kettle going, let the steam fill the room a little, and sit down with a nice, fragrant cuppa. Suggested reading material ? The Story of Tea by Mary Lou and Bob Heiss ( see Culture page 54).”

 Wow. Thank you Bon Appetit …….. I think that I could use one of those nice, fragrant cuppas and a sit down right about now !!

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Gianduja

giandugia.gifNo, this is not a polite etiquette term for ‘nice to meet you’ but an Italian confection that is, to me, sheer perfection. Gianduja is an untra-smooth and creamy blend of hazelnut paste and chocolate, and hails from the Piedmont region of northern Italy. In the Piedmontese city of Turin, old world baroque-style confectionary shops and caffes sell vast quanties of this exquisite sweet, as well as other gianduja based treats, such as gianduja gelato and gianduja mousse.
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Tagines

tajine_potter.jpgI must admit – I find food fascinating and exotic, and a window into the colorful cultures of others. For me, cuisine and culture are forever entangled in a unique dance that is orchestrated by the history and geography of a place; indigenous, local foods; and the story of its people.

Perhaps one of the most exotic of cuisines ( and I bestow that moniker to foods from geographic places that display an enticing quantity of aromatic ingredients, offer an eye-pleasing palette of colorful foods, and that has created unique utensils that add flair to cooking, presenting and serving food ) is Moroccan cuisine and tagine-cooked stew dishes in particular.
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